Customer Spotlight

Paving His Own Way

Dana DiPaolo – Bay State Pest Control – Wakefield, MA


Dana DiPaolo still remembers the first ad he ever ran for Bay State Pest Control. The year was 1994. He didn’t have much of an advertising budget, but he was able to scrape together enough money for a small ad in the local paper.

Dana DiPaolo still remembers the first ad he ever ran for Bay State Pest Control. The year was 1994. He didn’t have much of an advertising budget, but he was able to scrape together enough money for a small ad in the local paper.

“You basically needed a magnifying glass to read it,” DiPaolo says.

But the tiny ad worked. The first night it ran, DiPaolo received six calls. Of the six, he landed four new clients.

It was a much-needed victory. DiPaolo had turned to pest control out of sheer necessity. He’d previously worked as a trapper and a taxidermist, but business slowed. DiPaolo had even been forced to sell his prized collection of rare insects — “for pennies,” he recalls.

Luckily, his pest control business continued to grow. DiPaolo was making a name for himself as the PMP who was willing to work harder and later. He worked day and night, taking calls at 3 in the morning. He lent an open ear to customers who just needed to vent. And he did it all on his own.

“I had no one to help me in the pest control industry,” DiPaolo says. “I studied on my own. I learned on my own.”

Finding a distributor presented its own set of challenges. No one was willing to give a fledgling one-man operation a chance — no one except for Univar rep George Williams. With Williams’s help, DiPaolo was able to expand his knowledge and his clientele.

His company grew as well. Long gone are the days when DiPaolo had to work alone. Today, 23 years after that first newspaper ad, Bay State Pest Control has swelled to 14 employees. They include DiPaolo’s two children and his wife, Deneen, who serves as the company’s vice president.

In fact, business has grown to the point where DiPaolo doesn’t seek out distributors — they come to them. But DiPaolo has stuck with Univar and continues to work closely with Williams.

As for the insect collection he had to sell: working in pest control reignited DiPaolo’s passion for collecting. He’s amassed over 100,000 specimens from around the world. DiPaolo keeps them in a dedicated room in his home — his own personal museum.

“At one time, I was thinking of possibly opening a butterfly emporium,” DiPaolo says. “Maybe, in my later days, I’ll do that.”