ARE YOU WINTER READY?

Tips for Storing Pesticides


As winter rapidly approaches, applicators in colder regions should take the time to prepare spray equipment and any remaining pesticide supplies in ahead of prolonged periods of snow and ice. In order to minimize losses, and save money in the spring, let’s discuss how to properly store your pesticides during the winter.

As winter rapidly approaches, applicators in colder regions should take the time to prepare spray equipment and any remaining pesticide supplies in ahead of prolonged periods of snow and ice. In order to minimize losses, and save money in the spring, let’s discuss how to properly store your pesticides during the winter.

 

DRY PRODUCTS

Dry pesticide products, such as granular or wettable powders, are generally not impacted by freezing but should be stored in a dry location without direct sunlight.

LIQUID PRODUCTS

Liquid pesticides may freeze and result in the separation of the active ingredients from the carriers. This reaction may result in coagulation or crystallization which can cause plugging of spray lines in the spring. Some frozen pesticide products can retain effectiveness if applicators follow the right steps when thawing and re-dissolving in the suspension.

Pesticide products have different freezing temperatures due to the presence of hydrocarbon solvents in many formulations. Hydrocarbon solvents actually reduce the freezing point below 0 ᵒC. Pesticide product labels often explain a pesticides minimum storage temperature, in addition to whether:

  • freezing poses a problem
  • active ingredients separate from carriers if frozen
  • effectiveness of a pesticide is reduced if frozen
  • the active or inert ingredients go back into suspension after freezing

Applicators should always be familiar with proper storage directions on their pesticide product label. For more information beyond the label contact the product manufacturer or expert.

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(above: an example of product label storage directions on PestWeb.com)